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Southern Stone County Fire Protection District responds to dog attack on Thanksgiving

Published: Dec. 2, 2021 at 10:03 PM CST
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REEDS SPRING, Mo. (KY3) -The Southern Stone County Fire Protection District responded to a call on Thanksgiving for several people with dog bites.

One of the victims, a female in her 30′s, was airlifted to a hospital in Springfield.

*Aircraft Request* FS8 [Reeds Spring] Female attacked by a dog. Mercy Lifeline 1 lifting for the RS Junction LZ...

Posted by Southern Stone County Fire Protection District on Thursday, November 25, 2021

Chief Keith Wolven with the Southern Stone County Fire Protection District says the incident in Reeds Spring on Thanksgiving involved more than one animal.

“My understanding was they did have them penned up inside the house but they couldn’t get out of the house because the dogs were there, which apparently was the problem,” Chief Wolven says.

When it comes to responding to these kinds of calls, Chief Wolven says it’s not as unique as people may think.

“Animal bites, in general, are fairly common,” Chief Wolven says. “I’d say like every other week or so. Dog bites, in particular, are probably not as frequent.”

Because of where the dogs were located inside, firefighters needed to get into the house through a window to be able to secure the scene and offer medical treatment.

Chief Wolven says going through windows at any scene poses its own set of challenges for firefighters.

“You’ve probably seen on TV and on video stuff firefighters breaking windows out and it looks really macho,” Chief Wolven says. “Those are generally not realistic. You do have to watch the shards of glass as you’re going through. Depending on what you’re doing, anything left could pose a safety hazard as you go.”

Chief Wolven says the safety of the community members and firefighters is the priority.

Part of that comes from controlling the risk at the scene.

“If you do have unpredictable animals in the area, you need to know where those are and if they’re contained before you do much of anything,” Chief Wolven says. “If our guys get attacked or get injured in some place, then we’ve not helped the situation at all. We are in the risk business and we will put people in harm’s way. That’s what we do, with calculated risk and effort.”

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